Design project

The project is located in Brick Lane, winding through fields, the street was formerly called Whitechapel Lanebut derives its current name from former brick and tile manufacture, using the localbrick earth deposits, that began in the 15th century. I chose the site which is in the Old Truman Brewery.

I have been exploringBrick Lanemany times to choose the right place and theme for my project. Finally, I chose two bridges between the buildings. I have found it interesting because the most of the time this small street where the bridges are located is quiet even on the Sundays market where loads of people gathering for food, antiques etc. Brick Lane is very industrial place, for me it looked dark and cold, I was missing fresh air and green color.

I have been looking for the inspiration for my project everywhere, finally in one book I have found a pictures of Dutch Pavilion which is all covered by ivy. I was amazed by the shadows it was creating and the poetic feeling which I felt even through the photographs. So I tried to combine this idea with my chosen site. I thought that covering the bridges by ivy it would make it more pleasant, it would attract more people to the street and create poetic and romantic feeling.

The bridges would be used as a coffee shop, one bridge would have been used as a storage for coffee beans and the other one be used for making the coffee. They would have been connected with ropes between them so the coffee beans could be delivered.

Even though the street is always quiet, during the week days cars are being parked there, so the coffee shop would work just weekend and the tables would be hanging up between bridges and during the weekends they would be drawn down on the ground.

As the project went further I decided to change my coffee shop to the tea house which I think is more related to my design of growing greens on my building. Also I have changed my design. As I will be growing the tea, I had to find the right way to do it. I am lucky that the most of the time bridges are facing the sun from the South. I decided to grow tea on the roof where tea plants would get a lot of light. I would be growing four types of tea which is – mint, chamomile, rose hips and lemon balm. They don’t need much space or time to grow. During the spring and summer I would use fresh herbs for tea and during the autumn and winter I would use dried herbs. I would still keep one of the bridges for the storage but I would use just half of it and the other half would be use for people to cross the bridge from one building to another.

Tea

History of afternoon tea

Tea consumption increased dramatically during the early nineteenth century and it is around this time that Anna, the 7th Duchess of Bedford is said to have complained of “having that sinking feeling” during the late afternoon. At the time it was usual for people to take only two main meals a day, breakfast, and dinner at around 8 o’clock in the evening. The solution for the Duchess was a pot a tea and a light snack, taken privately in her boudoir during the afternoon.

Later friends were invited to join her in her rooms atWoburn Abbey and this summer practice proved so popular that the Duchess continued it when she returned to London, sending cards to her friends asking them to join her for “tea and a walking the fields.” Other social hostesses quickly picked up on the idea and the practice became respectable enough to move it into the drawing room. Before long all of fashionable society was sipping tea and nibbling sandwiches in the middle of the afternoon.

‘Afternoon Tea’ by artist George Goodwin Kilburne

Four types of tea i will be growing at the tea house: rose hip, chamomile, lemon balm and mint

For the design of the bridge I would use a timber panels and for the roof enclosure I would use glass. These materials are completely different from those which had been used for other buildings inBrick Lane. Timber panels would create a warm and cozy feeling in and around the space.

Brick lane

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